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makebootfat.d

Name{number}
      makebootfat - Makebootfat Bootable FAT Disk Creation

Synopsis
      :makebootfat [options] IMAGE

Description
      This utility creates a bootable FAT filesystem and
      populates it with files and boot tools.

      It is mainly designed to create bootable USB and
      Fixed disk for the AdvanceCD project.

      The official site of AdvanceCD and makebootfat is:

            +http://advancemame.sourceforge.net/

Options
      -o, --output DEVICE
            Specify the output device. It must be the device 
            where you want to setup the filesystem.
            You can use the special "usb" value to automatically
            select the USB Mass Storage device connected at
            the system.
            This option is always required.

      -b, --boot FILE
      -1, --boot-fat12 FILE
      -2, --boot-fat16 FILE
      -3, --boot-fat32 FILE
            Specify the FAT boot sector images to use. The -b option
            uses the same sector for all the FAT types. The other
            options can be used to specify a different sector for
            different FAT types. The FAT types for which a boot sector
            is not specified are not used.
            This option is always required.

      -m, --mbr FILE
            Specify the MBR sector image to use.
            If this option is specified a partition table is
            created on the disk. Otherwise the disk is filled without a
            partition table like a floppy disk.

      -F, --mbrfat
            Change the MBR image specified with the -m option to pretend
            to be a FAT filesystem starting from the first sector of
            the disk. This allows booting from USB-FDD (Floppy Disk Drive)
            also using a partition table generally required by USB-HDD
            (Hard Disk Drive).
            The MBR image specified with the -m option must have
            executable code positioned like a FAT boot sector. You
            can use the included `mbrfat.bin' file.

      -c, --copy FILE
            Copy the specified file in the root directory of the disk.
            The file is copied using the readonly attribute.

      -x, --exclude FILE
            Exclude the specified files and subdirectories in the
            IMAGE directory to copy. The path must be specified using
            the same format used in the IMAGE directory specification.

      -X, --syslinux2
            Enforce the syslinux 2.xx FAT limitations. Syslinux
            2.xx doesn't support FAT32 at all, and FAT16 with
            64 and 128 sectors per cluster formats.
            This option excludes all the FAT formats not supported
            by syslinux. Please note that it limits the maximum
            size of filesystem to 1 GB.

      -Y, --syslinux3
            Enforce the syslinux 3.xx FAT support. Syslinux 3.00
            supports all the FAT types and sizes but it requires
            a special customisation of the boot sector and of
            the file `ldlinux.sys'.
            This option does this customisation without the need
            to use the syslinux installer if the `ldlinux.sys'
            file is copied on disk with the -c option.

      -Z, --zip
            If possible force the ZIP-Disk compatibility. It sets
            a geometry of 32 sectors and 64 heads. It also uses the
            4'th partition entry in the partition table.
            It's required to boot also in USB-ZIP mode.

      -P, --partition
            Ensure to operate on a partition and not on a disk.

      -D, --disk
            Ensure to operate on a disk and not on a partition.

      -L, --label LABEL
            Set the FAT label. The label is a string of 11 chars.

      -O, --oem OEM
            Set the FAT OEM name. The OEM name is a string of 11 chars.

      -S, --serial SERIAL
            Set the FAT serial number. The serial number is a 32 bit
            unsigned integer.

      -E, --drive DRIVE
            Set the BIOS drive to setup in the FAT boot sector.
            Generally this value is ignored by boot sectors, with 
            the exception of the FAT12 and FAT16 FreeDOS boot sectors 
            that require the correct value or the value 255 to force
            auto detection.

      -v, --verbose
            Print some information on the device and on the filesystem 
            created.

      -i, --interactive
            Show the errors in a message box. Only for Windows.

      -h, --help
            Print a short help.

      -V, --version
            Print the version number.

      =IMAGE
            Directory image to copy on the disk. All the files
            and subdirectories present in this directory
            are copied on the disk.

Disks and Partitions Names
      In Linux disk devices are named /dev/hdX or /dev/sdX where X
      is a letter. Partition devices are named /dev/hdXN or /dev/sdXN
      where X is a letter and N a digit.

      In Windows disk devices are named \\.\PhysicalDriveN where N is
      a digit. Partition devices are named \\.\X: where X is a letter,
      but sometimes \\.\X: is a disk and not a partition, for example on 
      floppies and on all the USB Mass Storage devices without a
      partition table.

Syslinux
      To make a bootable FAT using syslinux you must use
      the -X option for syslinux version 2.xx or the -Y
      option for syslinux version 3.xx. You must also copy in
      the root directory of the disk the files:

      ldlinux.sys - The syslinux loader.
      syslinux.cfg - The syslinux configuration file.
      linux - The Linux kernel image  (the file name may be different).
      initrd.img - The initrd filesystem (the file name may be different
            or missing).

      You must also specify the `ldlinux.bss' boot sector with the -b
      option and possibily the `mbr.bin' MBR sector with the -m option.
      Both the sector images are present in the syslinux package.

      For example:

            :makebootfat -o usb \
            :     -Y \
            :     -b ldlinux.bss -m mbr.bin \
            :     -c ldlinux.sys -c syslinux.cfg \
            :     -c linux -c initrd.img \
            :     image

Loadlin and FreeDOS
      To make a bootable FAT using loadlin and FreeDOS you must copy
      in the root directory of the disk the files:

      kernel.sys - The FreeDOS kernel. Remember to use the "32" kernel
            version to support FAT32.
      command.com - The FreeDOS shell.
      autoexec.bat - Used to start loadlin.
      loadlin.exe - The loadlin executable.
      linux - The Linux kernel image  (the file name may be different).
      initrd.img - The initrd filesystem (the file name may be different
            or missing).

      You must also specify the FreeDOS boot sectors available on the
      FreeDOS `sys' source package with the -1, -2, -3 option.
      For the MBR you can use the sectors image available on the FreeDOS
      `fdisk' source package.

      For example:

            :makebootfat -o /dev/hda1 \
            :     -E 255 \
            :     -1 fat12com.bin -2 fat16com.bin -3 fat32lba.bin \
            :     -c kernel.sys -c command.com \
            :     -c autoexec.bat -c loadlin.exe \
            :     -c linux -c initrd.img \
            :     image

Multi Standard USB Booting
      The BIOS USB boot support is generally differentiated in three
      categories: USB-HDD, USB-FDD and USB-ZIP.

      The USB-HDD (Hard Disk Drive) standard is the preferred choice and
      it requires the presence of a partition table in the first sector
      of the disk. You can create this type of disk using the -m option.

      The USB-FDD (Floppy Disk Drive) standard requires the presence of
      a filesystem starting from the first sector of the disk without
      a partition table.
      You can create this type of disk without using the -m option.

      The USB-ZIP (ZIP Drive) standard requires the presence of a
      device with a very specific geometry. Specifically, it requires
      a geometry with 32 sectors and 64 heads. It also requires the presence
      of a partition table with only a bootable partition in the
      fourth entry. You can create this type of disk using the -m and -Z option.

      Generally these standards are incompatible, but using the -m, -F
      and -Z options you can create a disk compatible with all of them.

      To use the -F option, the MBR image specified must follow
      the constrains:

      * It must start with a standard FAT 3 bytes jump instruction.
      * It must have the bytes from address 3 to 89 (included) unused.

      And example of such image is in the `mbrfat.bin' file.

      For example to create a syslinux image:

            :makebootfat -o usb \
            :     -Y \
            :     -Z \
            :     -b ldlinux.bss -m mbrfat.bin -F \
            :     -c ldlinux.sys -c syslinux.cfg \
            :     -c linux -c initrd.img \
            :     image

      and for a FreeDOS and loadlin image:

            :makebootfat -o usb \
            :     -E 255 \
            :     -Z \
            :     -1 fat12com.bin -2 fat16com.bin -3 fat32chs.bin \
            :     -m mbrfat.bin -F \
            :     -c kernel.sys -c command.com \
            :     -c autoexec.bat -c loadlin.exe \
            :     -c linux -c initrd.img \
            :     image

      Please note that FreeDos has some problems booting
      from USB. It works only on very few conditions.

Exclusion
      To exclude some files or directories in the image copy, you
      can use the -x option using the same path specification
      which are you using for the image directory.

      For example, if you need to exclude the `isolinux' and
      `syslinux' subdirectories from the `image' directory
      you can use the command:

            :makebootfat ... \
            :     -x image/isolinux \
            :     -x image/syslinux \
            :     image

Copyright
      This file is Copyright (C) 2004, 2005 Andrea Mazzoleni

See Also
      syslinux(1), mkdosfs(1), dosfsck(1)


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